RMIT research

Exploring Participant Experiences with Online Peer Support Groups for Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, are currently exploring the experiences of people with obsessive-compulsive and related conditions who use online peer support groups to cope with their condition. We are seeking people aged 18+ who experience hair-pulling, skin-picking or other obsessive-compulsive behaviours (including body dysmorphia). You do not need to be a current or active member of any online peer support groups to take part, as we are interested in a wide range of experiences. If you decide to take part, you will be invited to complete an anonymous online survey which will take 30 minutes to complete. Participation is completely voluntary, and you can withdraw your participation at any time.

More information, as well as the link to the survey, can be found here: https://rmit.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bjZSy98gwJQ9qFn or you can contact the principle investigator, Dr Alexander De Foe: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
Do you repeatedly pull out your hair or pick at your skin?
Is this behaviour impacting your quality of life?
Are you interested in learning more about these behaviours and yourself?

Individuals with hair-pulling disorder repeatedly pull out hair from parts of their body, such as the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelids, leading to hair loss. Similarly, skin-picking disorder involves repetitive picking of the skin, resulting in tissue damage. These poorly understood repetitive behaviours can cause an individual significant harm and distress.

Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, are exploring the daily experiences of trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder) and excoriation (skin-picking) disorder, and whether sensory experiences (e.g., touch, sight, hearing) contribute to urges to engage in these behaviours. We hope that this study may help the development of more effective and comprehensive treatment options for those living with these repetitive behaviours, internationally.

We are seeking:

  • People aged 18-80 to participate in this study
  • Who experience hair-pulling and/or skin-picking behaviours that are difficult to control or have caused unwanted, non-cosmetic hair loss or skin damage

You will be asked to participate in an online survey. After completion, participants can choose to partake in a 7-day period of completing brief surveys sent to your smartphone or tablet device. Participants may also be invited to participate in interviews discussing their experiences of the 7-day monitoring period (Australian residents only).

Please click on the link below for further information and to access the survey: https://rmit.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ekTcZwwi46Y6sqF

For any further queries, please contact:

  • Dr Imogen Rehm, Chief Investigator, Ph: +613 9925 7341, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Ami-Sheree Laffy, Primary Research Student, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Stephanie De Pasquale, Primary Research Student, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
 
Meaning and Experiences of Recovery from Anxiety

Do you have personal experience of an anxiety condition?
Has it ever impacted on your life in a negative way?
Are you interested to explore what it means to experience social, emotional and personal recovery from anxiety?

Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions, worldwide. In Australia, up to 14% of adults reported experiencing an anxiety disorder in the last year. Anxiety is a problematic feature of many related conditions, such as:
• Generalised anxiety disorder
• Phobia and panic disorders
• Post-traumatic stress disorder
• Obsessive-compulsive disorder and related conditions like hoarding, skin-picking and hair-pulling
• Social anxiety
• Separation anxiety

These conditions can negatively affect a person’s self-esteem, relationships, sense of connection to others, and the ability to work, study and participate in enjoyable activities. The ability to participate in these important aspects of life can be referred to as “recovery”.

We are seeking people aged 18+ who have past or current experience of anxiety to participate in an anonymous online survey. This survey asks about your anxiety symptoms and what recovery from anxiety means to you. It will take 25-30 minutes to complete.

Survey link:  https://rmit.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a34RnSN2l33mV9P  


For any further queries, please contact:
Dr Imogen Rehm, Chief Investigator, Ph: +613 9925 7341, e-mail:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Alana Bartone, Primary Research Student, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.